Topic: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

A l'occasion des élections municipales au Royaume-Uni, je propose de créer un fil sur la vie politique anglaise.

Tout d'abord, premières estimations.

The Independent a écrit:

A bad night, says Brown after poll mauling

With results available from 154 councils, the state of parties is:
Councils: Con +12, Lab -8, Lib Dem +1;
Councillors: Con +252, Lab -297, Lib Dem +25

AFP/Getty

Friday, 2 May 2008

Gordon Brown promised today to “listen and lead” after the Labour Party suffered its worst local election results for 40 years.

In his first elections as Labour leader, Mr Brown saw his party come a humiliating third behind the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats. With results in two thirds of the 159 councils in England and Wales holding elections known, Labour’s projected share of the national vote was 24 per cent – two points below its recent low in 2004 when Tony Blair was hit by a backlash over the Iraq war.

The Conservatives won an estimated 44 per cent share of the vote, allowing them to claim they were on course for a general election victory. David Cameron today hailed the results as “a big moment” and “a positive vote of confidence” in the Tories. But he warned his party against complacency.

Labour was also bracing itself for another major setback in the election for London Mayor, with sources predicting that Ken Livingstone would be defeated by his Tory opponent Boris Johnson. The result will be announced this evening.

Mr Brown refused to concede that Ken Livingstone had been defeated in the London Mayoral race. However, he did appear to hint that he agreed with other Labour insiders - who believe their candidate is likely to have lost - by thanking Mr Livingstone for what he had done for London over the past eight years.

"I spoke to Ken Livingstone last night. I congratulated him on his campaign and what he had done to secure the Olympics for London, what he had done for transport in London and what he has done to improve policing in London, and what he was doing for affordable housing in London - all these issues that Ken Livingstone has raised as mayor."

Speaking in Downing Street, Mr Brown admitted that Labour had suffered a “bad night.” He said: “My job is to listen and to lead. We will learn lessons, we will reflect on what has happened and then we will move forward.”

The Prime Minister pledged that the Government would steer the country through difficult economic times, and prepare for the upturn and prosperity that would follow. “The test of leadership is not what happens in a period of success but what happens in difficult circumstances,” he said. He accepted that he needed to show “strength and resolution as well as the conviction and ideas to take the country forward”.

But as the inquest into Labour’s mauling began, some Labour MPs called for a change of direction. Tony Lloyd, chairman of the Parliamentary Labour Party, said the voters had sent a "very clear signal" to Labour in a "referendum on where the Government stands". He said the row over the 10p tax change had hurt Labour.

The Tories seized control in Southampton, Bury, Harlow, Maidstone, Nuneaton and Bedworth, Wyre Forest West Lindsey, North Tyneside and the Vale of Glamorgan and have gained more than 200 seats. Labour, which also lost control of Wolverhampton and Reading, lost well over that number of seats and its support appears to have fallen most heavily in its traditional heartlands, where the abolition of the 10p income tax rate damaged their prospects.

Nick Clegg passed his first test as Liberal Democrat leader by pushing Labour into third place. He said today: “It is a very strong result. We have increased the number of councillors when I was being told for the last several weeks that we were almost certainly going to lose councillors. We have outpolled Labour for only the second time in our party's history, and crucially we have been winning against both Labour and the Conservatives."

A jubilant David Cameron today hailed a "vote of positive confidence" for the Tories as Labour plunged to their worst local election results for a generation.

The Conservative leader said it was a "very big moment" for his party on the long road back to back to power at Westminster as projections showed Labour crashing to third place in the popular vote.

"I think these results are not just a vote against Gordon Brown and his Government. I think they are a vote of positive confidence in the Conservative Party," he told reporters as he left his west London home.

"I think this is a very big moment for the Conservative Party, but I don't want anyone to think that we would deserve to win an election just on the back of a failing Government.

"I want us to really prove to people that we can make the changes they want to see. That's what I'm going to devote myself and my party to doing over the next few months."

Labour's margin of defeat was similar to the drubbing received by John Major in council elections in 1995, two years before he was ejected from Downing Street by Tony Blair.

The Tories would enjoy a landslide Commons majority of between 138 and 164 seats if the results were repeated in a General Election.

"Je hais les indifférents. Pour moi, vivre veut dire prendre parti. Celui qui vit vraiment ne peut pas ne pas être citoyen ou partisan. L'indifférence est apathie, elle est parasitisme, elle est lâcheté, elle n'est pas vie. C'est pourquoi je hais les indifférents." - Antonio Gramsci (La Città futura, 11 février 1917).

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Necrid_Master a écrit:

Tout d'abord, premières estimations.

Avant l'heure du thé, sachez que Boris Johnson est le nouveau maire de Londres.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/7380947.stm

Après Alemanno en Italie, on peut s'estimer heureux. La tendance européenne aurait voulu que Panafieu batte Delanoë.

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Londres, Rome, Madrid à droite ; Paris et Berlin à gauche.

Last edited by Necrid_Master (03-05-2008 01:56:56)

"Je hais les indifférents. Pour moi, vivre veut dire prendre parti. Celui qui vit vraiment ne peut pas ne pas être citoyen ou partisan. L'indifférence est apathie, elle est parasitisme, elle est lâcheté, elle n'est pas vie. C'est pourquoi je hais les indifférents." - Antonio Gramsci (La Città futura, 11 février 1917).

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

BBC a écrit:

Conservative Party leader David Cameron praised Mr Johnson for a "serious and energetic campaign" and said his party was "winning the battle of ideas".

C'est quand même comique quand on sait à quel point Johnson est un guignol...

Last edited by Surfin'USA (03-05-2008 02:09:33)

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Il prétend réintroduire le Routemaster, c'est dire ...

Tu me dis vous ... Aaaaa ... après tu

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Et on peut savoir ce qu'est le Routemaster ?

Ich bin jetzt alt und gichtbrüchig,
Und meine Sünden beissen mich.

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

il faut dire que le Routemaster avait tellement de classe...

@Seryeuse : ce sont les bus à impériale de Londres

Last edited by roxx (03-05-2008 08:51:41)

If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.

« A quoi bon détruire les dictateurs si l’on continue, sous prétexte de discipline sociale et pour faciliter la tâche des gouvernements, à former des êtres faits pour vivre en troupeaux ? Ce ne sont pas les dictateurs qui font les dictatures, ce sont les troupeaux »

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Je crains qu'il n'y ait pire dans son record. Genre:

"If gay marriage was OK - and I was uncertain on the issue - then I saw no reason in principle why a union should not be consecrated between three men, as well as two men, or indeed three men and a dog."

"We look in vain for the enlightened Islamic teachers and preachers who will begin the process of reform. What is going on in these mosques and madrasas? "When is someone going to get 18th century on Islam’s mediaeval ass?"

Enfin bon, il est drôle, alors on peut comprendre les londoniens, non ?

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Cherie est en colère -et sa colère remplit utilement les pages de The Independent.

The Independent a écrit:

Cherie's revenge: Explosive revelations pile woe on beleaguered Brown

Interviews to promote £1m publication of memoirs damage PM while he is at his most vulnerable by throwing light on the troubled relationship between Tony Blair and his successor.

By Jane Merrick and Brian Brady
Sunday, 11 May 2008

If revenge is a dish best served cold, it may taste even better garnished with an added element of surprise. So Cherie Blair's decision to catch Gordon Brown unawares and publish her memoirs several months early will be savoured by the Prime Minister's enemies at a moment when he is considered to be at his most vulnerable.

The first extracts of the autobiography, published yesterday, did not unleash a "killer line" that could bring down the premier. But they contained a series of carefully worded, potentially destabilising comments putting on the record for the first time Mrs Blair's view – and her husband's – of Mr Brown.

"The problem with me and Gordon is nothing personal," she insisted in an interview to accompany serialisation, before reeling off examples of the difficult relationship that has dominated New Labour. "It is because I thought my husband was the best person for the job and it is a damn difficult job."

And Mr Brown's "impatience" about Mr Blair moving on "was a difficulty Tony could do without".

Even a supposedly positive comment from her interviews yesterday – that Mr Blair is advising Mr Brown on how to win the next election – left the impression of an embattled Prime Minister who is unelectable without the help of his old rival.

The shock serialisation came at the end of a week in which Mr Brown was beginning to show signs of a fightback after the disastrous May Day elections.

In her book, Mrs Blair claimed that in April 2004 the then Chancellor was "rattling the keys" above her husband's head to try to hound him out of office.

In fact, sources said last night, Mr Brown began demanding to know when Mr Blair would step down as early as 2003 – because that was part of the deal understood by the Brown camp. At one point during this period, Mr Brown was asking the Prime Minister "several times a week" when he was leaving.

Mr Blair would have handed over power much earlier than last July but feared his programme of reform for the public services was in jeopardy under Mr Brown's premiership, Mrs Blair wrote.

Downing Street was not told in advance the book was being serialised, accompanied by interviews in The Times and The Sun newspapers – meaning the first Mr Brown knew was when rumours began swirling around Westminster late on Friday. The failure to alert him was seen as an extraordinary break with traditional courtesy.

But a Blairite source said: "Gordon never told Tony what was in the Budget. Why should Cherie give him a heads-up about this?"

Sources close to Mrs Blair insisted publication was brought forward because she feared being accused by Brown supporters of overshadowing Labour's conference in September, the original date for publication.

Yet the timing coincides with Labour being 26 points adrift in the polls after the local elections and fresh speculation about a challenge to Mr Brown's vulnerable leadership.

There was a sense that the publication, together with a highly critical piece by Blairite former minister Stephen Byers in a newspaper today, was an attempt to "kill off" Mr Brown.

Mrs Blair infamously branded Mr Brown a "liar" at the Labour Party conference two years ago when he pledged loyalty to the then premier after the failed coup by Brownites. It prompted Mr Blair to joke that he did not have to worry about his wife "running off with the bloke next door".

She has said little else in public until now.

Insiders said she wanted to go much further in her memoirs, Speaking for Myself, but after discussions with her husband she was persuaded to tone down the content of the rows between the two men. In fact, many of the passages published yesterday appeared to have come from the ex-premier himself.

She writes: "Gordon wanted to become Prime Minister so much, he failed to understand that, had he been prepared to implement Tony's programmes on internal reform – academy schools, foundation hospitals and pensions – Tony would have stood down, there is no question. Instead of which Tony felt he had no option but to stay on and fight for the things he believed in."

In her Sun interview, asked whether she agreed with comments by the Labour peer Lord Desai that "Gordon Brown was put on this planet to show how brilliant Tony Blair was", Mrs Blair "threw her head back and roared with laughter". She said: "As his wife, I would say Tony is brilliant."

And appearing almost indifferent about the Prime Minister's current difficulties, she told The Times: "The good thing is Gordon is not alone in No 10. He has Sarah and has the children, so even in these darkest moments he knows there is something important outside politics for him."

Mrs Blair's preoccupation with money is a constant theme in the book. She describes the mortgage on their £3.6m Connaught Square house, bought in 2004, as "the size of Mount Snowdon": "Whatever happened, we had to meet the monthly payment and it was down to me. Because no one else was going to meet it, were they?"

Charting her working-class childhood in north Liverpool, Mrs Blair writes about how she barely saw her parents, the actors Tony and Gale Booth, until she was two. She was raised by her paternal grandmother, whose bed she shared in their terrace home in Ferndale Road on the rough side of Crosby. Her mother worked in a local chip shop.

Even though her husband now earns an estimated £2.5m from the Wall Street bankers JPMorgan and the Blairs have just bought the grand country home of the late actor Sir John Gielgud, 20 miles from Chequers, she says her upbringing close to the poverty line has never left her.

"Coming from my background, I don't think I will ever feel secure about money, because I lived in a household which never fell into abject poverty, but we were always on the line. I think one has to remember that I know what it is like to get to the end of the week and have no money left," she told The Times.

Mrs Blair, 53, appeared to regret how much time her husband is now spending as Middle East envoy, revealing that they celebrated his 55th birthday two days early because he had to fly abroad for at least 10 days. "I hope all this travelling is not for ever, just while he's getting settled into his new job. I know Leo misses him. Tony has always been such a hands-on father."

Asked by The Sun whether she has ever worried about the former PM being unfaithful, Mrs Blair said: "Never. Tony is a deeply religious person and takes his wedding vows very seriously."

She rejected claims by Lord Levy – backed by insiders – that Mr Blair was warned by Downing Street officials about "long massages" with her "lifestyle guru" Carole Caplin, insisting it was her idea for Ms Caplin to give her husband massages. Mrs Blair dismissed suggestions that they were engaged in an affair. "I thought it was good for him to be completely relaxed. I trusted her and I certainly completely trusted him."

She confirmed details of the legendary battle Mr Blair and Mr Brown had over the Labour succession following John Smith's death in 1994. The exchanges were so "stormy" as Mr Blair persuaded his rival to give him a clear run for the Labour leadership that they did not happen in public, at the Granita restaurant, as the myth goes, but at her sister Lyndsey's home nearby.

"The Granita meeting was basically for them to talk about the announcement. It wasn't the forum for the kind of stormy discussions that had preceded it. No way would that have happened in public, in a restaurant."

Mrs Blair appeared to confirm that she has a frosty relationship with Mr Brown's wife, Sarah. She said the pair "didn't really socialise" and complained about the level of support her successor receives at No 10. "Sarah – I'm so pleased, because that is one of the things I wanted – has more support. She has four people working for her, while I had two."

Mrs Blair is expected to earn around £1m for the memoirs from publisher Little, Brown. She will receive tens of thousands of pounds more in serialisation rights from the two Rupert Murdoch-owned newspapers.

Unlike books by former ministers and civil servants, the manuscript was not subject to scrutiny by the Cabinet Office because Mrs Blair was never paid by the state, and a hard copy did not exist until this weekend, when printing presses began to roll.

Mrs Blair's publicity team denied allegations that extracts had been released this weekend to cause a stuttering Prime Minister maximum damage. Instead, it seemed, she wanted to put an end to continuing speculation about its contents. "There's been a huge amount of inaccurate press speculation about what was in it and the publishers wanted to put an end to that," explained Liz Sich of the Colman Getty Consultancy, which is handling the book's publicity.

Amid the furore over the surprise publication, Mr Blair's former colleagues mounted a rather limp campaign to dampen down the impact of the thoughts of "Lady MacBooth".

"Cherie is Cherie and everyone knows that," a former occupant of Mr Blair's back-room team said. "That is one of the things that makes her so attractive. She is certainly her own woman, but she hasn't written a book that is going to damage the Labour Party."

What she said, what she meant

Cherie Blair's memoirs, and her comments in interviews to publicise the book yesterday, appear to be an exercise in extraordinary self-restraint. Here we unpick her quotes and suggest what she really meant by them.

'Sarah [Brown] – I'm so pleased, because that is one of the things I wanted – has more support. She has four people working for her, whilst I had two.'

Why didn't I have four members of staff? It's not fair.

'I have been a Labour Party person since I was 16, and even before that, and I know they are the best party for the country and I want to see them win again. I would be delighted to campaign for them.'

I want to see Labour win again under David Miliband, and would only campaign for the party if he was in charge.

'The problem between Gordon and me is not anything personal.'

The problem between Gordon and me is we hate each other's guts.

'The good thing is that Gordon is not alone in No 10. He has Sarah and has the children, so even in these darkest moments he knows there is something important outside politics for him.'

We all know he's a bit strange, and without Sarah and the children he would completely lose it.

'Tony has been lucky enough to get a job which means we can afford a country house.'

At last! After all this time of me juggling balls to prop up the family finances, he's finally earning some serious money.

'Carole [Caplin] isn't dodgy at all...It was my idea for him to have massages because I thought it was good for him to be relaxed.'

Well, her former boyfriend, Peter Foster, was a bit dodgy and I wasn't sure about the massages, but she was the closest thing I had to a best friend.

'The new leader [in 1994] had to be someone they could relate to. Tony had always been more appealing to the general public than Gordon, and more grounded in the realities of everyday life.'

Let's face it, I always said Gordon was a bit of a highly strung weirdo and the chickens are coming home to roost now, aren't they?

'Tony was always very supportive of Gordon having his chance.'

Tony was always very supportive of Gordon having his chance to make a mess of things and prove that he was the better leader.

'The Granita meeting was basically for them to talk about the announcement. It wasn't the forum for the kind of stormy discussions that had preceded it. No way would that have happened in public, in a restaurant.'

Gordon hit the roof when Tony suggested the deal. There would have been guacamole all over the walls if it had happened at Granita.

'I wanted him to go on his own terms. I accept that I am not objective on this and, frankly, it would be odd if I were.'

How dare Gordon allow his cronies to try to force Tony out in a coup [in September 2006]? And then to stand up at party conference and claim he was loyal? Liar!

Jane Merrick

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Tories target 'extraordinary' win

The Conservatives have not gained a seat at a by-election since 1982

The Conservatives are "pulling out all the stops" to win Thursday's Crewe and Nantwich by-election, shadow home secretary David Davis has told the BBC.

Mr Davis said it was going "quite well" as polls suggested the party could make its first by-election gain since 1982.

But he cautioned that "in a mile race the lap that matters is the last lap" - he said it would be "hard fought" and a win would be "quite extraordinary".

Ed Miliband, for Labour, said the party could turn round poor opinion polls.

But Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg told the BBC his party could win the by-election as the Labour vote "collapses" and people question whether the Conservatives had "the substance" to go with "their rhetoric".

Mr Davis told BBC One's Andrew Marr Show: "We have got a 7,000 majority to overturn.

"We haven't won a by-election from Labour in 30 years. But we are pulling out all the stops."

Asked about the broader political picture, and Mr Brown's difficulties, Mr Davis said he had been surprised.

"I was the Jeremiah in the Tory party. I said, 'watch this man, be careful, he's dangerous'. And for the first three months it looked like I was right.

"But actually the number of unforced errors he has made has been quite extraordinary in truth - quite extraordinary."

Mr Davis was speaking after an ICM poll for the News of the World suggested that 45% of people in Crewe and Nantwich were planning to vote Conservative, with 37% for Labour.

Meanwhile a national YouGov poll for the Sunday Times put the Conservatives on 45%, with Labour on 25% and the Liberal Democrats on 18%.

'Adventurous campaigning'

Cabinet Office minister Ed Miliband said that the polls were bad, but insisted that Labour could turn them round.

He told Sky's Adam Boulton: "We have got to get Britain through the economic difficulties it faces and we have got to go out and fight for what we believe in.

"I am confident that if we do that, we can turn round the opinion polls."

Ministers and shadow ministers are expected to keep up their visits to the constituency this week ahead of voting.

Mr Miliband insisted Labour had fought a good campaign, dismissing the "class war" attacks on the Conservatives as typical of the "stunts" and "adventurous ways" of campaigning used in by-elections.

"Our central campaign in Crewe and Nantwich is about Gwyneth Dunwoody being a unique MP and Tamsin Dunwoody (her daughter) being the best person to take forward Gwyneth's legacy."

Edward Timpson will fight the seat for the Conservatives, while Elizabeth Shenton will stand for the Liberal Democrats.

Deputy Labour leader Harriet Harman also sought to talk up the candidate's strength when asked on BBC One's Politics Show about the attacks on the Conservative candidate's background.

Ms Harman, educated at one of the top girls public schools, said the campaign was "not the most positive".

She said it had been intended to highlight the difference between candidates rather than demonise Mr Timpson.

She said she "never made any issue about my background. What we are saying in Crewe is we think Tamsin is the best candidate and we are putting the focus on her."

"Je hais les indifférents. Pour moi, vivre veut dire prendre parti. Celui qui vit vraiment ne peut pas ne pas être citoyen ou partisan. L'indifférence est apathie, elle est parasitisme, elle est lâcheté, elle n'est pas vie. C'est pourquoi je hais les indifférents." - Antonio Gramsci (La Città futura, 11 février 1917).

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Gordon Brown s'accroche et remanie son gouvernement après le départ de sept ministres en quelques jours dans ce qui a été la pire semaine du Labour depuis des décennies, en attendant les résultats des européennes dimanche soir. Aux élections locales de jeudi, le parti a perdu 268 sièges de conseillers et n'en détient plus que 176, contre 1476 (+230) aux conservateurs et 473 (-4) aux libéraux démocrates. Ce qui n'est pas bon.


Bloodied Gordon Brown vows: 'I will not waver or walk away'

 
Gordon Brown tonight said he would not "waver or walk away" from Downing Street at the end of a day of surprise resignations, a hastily redrafted cabinet reshuffle, and the Labour party facing obliteration in the local elections.

In an extraordinary 24 hours that left political corpses littered across Westminster, Brown restored a degree of his authority when no other cabinet minister followed James Purnell by quitting in protest, and two critical cabinet figures – David Miliband and John Hutton – decided to shore up Brown's position rather than join a potential rebellion.

The prime minister, despite being unable to complete the kind of cabinet reshuffle he had wanted, was still defiant, saying: "I will get on with the job. I have faith in doing my duty ... I believe in never walking away in difficult times."

Labour rebels were regrouping tonight to mount a fresh assault on his leadership over the weekend in the wake of what are expected to be even worse European parliament election results, due to be announced on Sunday night. They were still maintaining that they could collect 70-80 signatures on a letter asking the prime minister to step down.

Leading leftwing MPs were planning to hold talks over the weekend with supporters of Alan Johnson, the man most likely to succeed Brown, to see if they can agree a clearer policy agenda, insisting they would not be frogmarched into an empty coronation of a new leader based around personality. "We are not a cheap date," said one.

Brown's fate may be sealed at a meeting of Labour MPs on Monday night, by which time backbenchers will have to show their hand or admit defeat.

But even as the prime minister was promoting his team as the best one to haul Britain out of recession, Caroline Flint, the Europe minister, reversed her decision to stay loyal and announced she was standing down. In an extraordinary attack, she accused Brown of using her as "little more than female window dressing".

In a dramatic day at Westminster, with Brown's chances of survival wavering :

• He was forced to scale back his reshuffle and retain Alistair Darling as chancellor, leaving his protege, Ed Balls, to stay at the children's department.

• Three cabinet ministers quit – the defence secretary, John Hutton, the transport secretary, Geoff Hoon, and the Welsh secretary, Paul Murphy.

• It emerged that Brown had repaid £181.88 to the Commons fees office following further claims about his Commons expenses. The Daily Telegraph reported he had submitted an electricity bill for his home in Fife which partly covered a period when London was his designated second home.

• Lord Mandelson was in effect appointed deputy prime minister and given the lead role in fighting the recession, when his business department was given an enhanced role.

• Norwich North's Labour MP, Ian Gibson, said he was resigning, prompting a byelection in protest at the way in which he was treated over his expenses.

The Blairite MP Stephen Byers led others questioning Brown's leadership, warning: "I think on Monday Labour MPs will be considering a very important question – is Gordon Brown a winner, or is Gordon Brown a loser?"

With most results in, Labour was heading for third place in the local elections. Results from councils showed Labour has been wiped off the electoral map in England outside big cities.

The last four county councils held by Labour –Lancashire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire and Nottinghamshire – all fell to the Tories. With 30 of 34 councils declared, Labour had lost 250 seats while the Tories had gained 217. The BNP gained its first two county council seats.

Labour came third in the BBC's estimated projected national vote share in the local elections - the Conservatives are on 38%, Labour on 23%, a historic low, the Lib Dems on 28%, and other parties on 11%.

No 10 was throughout the day warning Labour backbenchers that if they forced Brown from office, a new prime minister would not withstand the demands to hold a near instant general election that would lead to a Labour wipeout.

No 10 argued Labour's chances of emerging as a functioning party from this crisis depended on limping through the autumn under Brown's leadership in the belief that the economy would recover.

It was also said that some of the ministers with the most controversial expenses claims, details of which are still to emerge, have now left the cabinet, so making it easier to restore Labour's tarnished image. Speaking at Downing Street, Brown said the political crisis, fuelled by the Westminster expenses scandal, was "a test of everyone's nerve – mine, the government's, the country's".

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

A quelques mois des élections législatives en Grande Bretagne, les leaders des trois principaux partis viennent de trouver un accord pour participer, pour la première fois, à des débats télévisés.

BBC a écrit:

Brown to face three televised election debates

The UK looks set to have its first ever televised prime ministerial debates after a deal was struck between the big three parties and broadcasters.

Labour's Gordon Brown, Conservative leader David Cameron and Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg have agreed to go head-to-head in a series of three debates.

The first will be on ITV, the second on Sky and the third on the BBC.

There will also be separate debates involving the main parties in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Earlier the SNP and Plaid Cymru said they should be allowed to take part in the main debates.

Live presidential debates in the US and other countries have provided many of the key moments of election campaigns and are seen as having raised voters' interest.

Themed

But in the UK, despite many calls for such debates to be held, there has never been agreement reached between leaders and with broadcasters.
“ These debates will be an opportunity to start re-engaging people with politics ”
Nick Clegg

The programmes will be broadcast in peak time during the General Election campaign and will be between 85 and 90 minutes long in front of a selected audience.

ITV's Alastair Stewart will host the first, Sky's Adam Boulton the second and the BBC's David Dimbleby will host the third debate.

The format will be the same for each, although about half of each debate will be themed.

There will be separate debates held in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland among all the main parties, which will be broadcast on BBC Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and across the UK on the BBC News Channel.

And following the prime ministerial debates, all political parties which have significant levels of support at a national level will be offered opportunities across BBC output to respond to the issues raised in the debate.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown told the Daily Mirror: "I relish the opportunity provided by these debates to discuss the big choices the country faces.

"Choices like whether we lock in the recovery or whether we choke it off; whether we protect the NHS, schools and police or whether we put them at risk to pay for tax cuts for the wealthy few."

Speaking at a public meeting, Conservative leader David Cameron said: "I have always believed in live television debates.

"I think they can help enliven our democracy, I think they will help answer people's questions, I think they will crystallise the debate about the change this country needs."

'Vigorous debate'

Liberal Democrat leader Mr Clegg said he was "delighted".

"After a terrible year for politicians because of the expenses scandals, these debates will be an opportunity to start re-engaging people with politics... I hope an open, honest and vigorous debate will encourage more people to have their say at the ballot box."

The election is widely expected to be held on Thursday 6 May although there has been speculation that it could be called for 25 March instead.

Ric Bailey, the BBC's chief adviser on politics, said a lot of work had been done to get agreement and there was still some way to go on the detail.

He added: "I think it is quite significant in the sense that it's never happened before and all three of the biggest parties in the UK have agreed to do it."

Discussions will resume in the new year to finalise detailed arrangements for the debates.

Opposition leaders regularly call for TV debates in the run-up to general elections but while they are commonplace in the US, they have not been held in Britain.

Tony Blair refused to take part in one when he was prime minister and Mr Brown has previously argued that the situation is different in the US, where presidents are directly elected.

'Completely undemocratic'

British prime ministers have argued that they are questioned regularly, at prime minister's questions and in statements to the Commons.

Critics also say such debates overly personalise a UK election campaign, where people vote for a local MP rather than directly for a leader.

There have also been questions about whether the debates should be a head-to-head between the leaders of the two largest parties or whether the Lib Dem leader should also be included.

Earlier, before the announcement was made that debates would be made available to other parties, the SNP and Plaid Cymru said they should be allowed to take part in the main debates.

Scottish National Party leader Alex Salmond said he would be seeking "guarantees of inclusion from the broadcasters, given their inescapable duty to ensure fairness and impartiality in election-related coverage in Scotland.

"It is entirely unacceptable to Scotland as well as to the SNP for the broadcasters to exclude the party that forms the government of Scotland - and indeed is now leading in Westminster election polls," he said.

And Plaid Cymru's Westminster leader Elfyn Llwyd said it was "completely undemocratic" as it would give the main parties an unfair advantage. He said he would complain to the Electoral Commission.

"Both Plaid Cymru and the SNP are in government in the respective devolved administrations and it is an insult that such important political voices are to be left out of such a historic event," he said.

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

BBC World a écrit:

Hung parliament in UK, Conservatives absolute majority short by 19 seats.

Labour Lib-dem coalition ?
projections :
307 tories
255 labour
55 lib-dem (surprise, pas de percée ?)
29 autres

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Free French a écrit:

Labour Lib-dem coalition ?

Bof, avec les députés unionistes irlandais, les conservateurs auront leur majorité. S'ils n'en ont pas une absolue au fur et à mesure du dépouillement...

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Le speaker et ses 3 deputies ne votent normalement pas si ma mémoire me fait pas défaut, sachant que les 5 Sinn Fein ne votent pas non plus, ça fait pas 650 mais 641, donc une majorité absolute à 321.

Même en additionnant les unionistes, (enfin ce qu'il en reste, putain que c'est bon de mater les résultats nord-irlandais) ça fait que 315.

Last edited by Elessar (07-05-2010 18:39:58)

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

The Guardian a écrit:

6.45pm: Here's a late afternoon summary.

Gordon Brown has announced that he is going to resign. He said that he did not want to go immediately, but he said that he wanted Labour to have a new leader by the time of the party's autumn conference (ie by September). He accepted that he had to take responsibility for the party's poor election result. His resignation will make it easier for Labour to form a government with the Lib Dems. But he has now made it clear that he is going whether or not Labour remains in office.

Nick Clegg has formally opened negotiations with Labour. This afternoon it became clear that Lib Dem MPs had reservations about the proposed deal with the Tories. Now Gordon Brown has slapped a counter-offer on the table. The Lib Dems could join Labour (and, Brown implied, the Scottish and Welsh nationalists and others) to form a "progressive" alliance. They would just about have a majority.

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

En comptant toujours la majorité à 321, Labour-LibDem-DUP ça passerait. Mais on peut avoir des doutes sur la volonté du DUP. 

En tout cas pour proposer Labour-LibDem-SNP-Plaid, Brown a un sacré sens de l'humour. Quoi que les trois premiers ça fait pile 321.

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Elessar a écrit:

En comptant toujours la majorité à 321, Labour-LibDem-DUP ça passerait. Mais on peut avoir des doutes sur la volonté du DUP. 

En tout cas pour proposer Labour-LibDem-SNP-Plaid, Brown a un sacré sens de l'humour. Quoi que les trois premiers ça fait pile 321.

Il ne faut pas oublier qu'il y a maintenant une députée écologiste et une Irlandaise unioniste-indépendante qui est proche des travaillistes. Enfin c'est vrai qu'il ne faudra pas que trop de députés tombent malades en hiver... Aucun même.

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Ah oui je la croyais vendue aux tories celle là tiens. Ca va donner un truc aussi stable et rigolo que Prodi.
Ah et il faut pas oublier que l'Alliance, c'est les LibDem à peu de choses près. Donc logiquement on peut l'ajouter celle là aussi.

Comme tu dis il faudra faire sans grippe l'hiver prochain.

Last edited by Elessar (10-05-2010 21:09:28)

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Elessar a écrit:

Ah oui je la croyais vendue aux tories celle là tiens. Ca va donner un truc aussi stable et rigolo que Prodi.
Ah et il faut pas oublier que l'Alliance, c'est les LibDem à peu de choses près. Donc logiquement on peut l'ajouter celle là aussi.

Oui, mais de toute manière je vois pas trop comment ça peut tenir plus de six mois, puisqu'il y aura bien des morts ou des élections partielles. Enfin c'est toujours ça de pris (si ça se fait).

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

http://www.lemonde.fr/europe/article/20 … L-32280151

Il aurait l'intention de quitter la place à l'automne en faisant exploser sa coalition de bric et de broc et de laisser la place à quelqu'un d'autre, donc il a pas l'intention de faire durer ça éternellement.

Par ailleurs SNP et Plaid se frottent déjà les mains :

http://www.snp.org/node/17046

Last edited by Elessar (11-05-2010 12:01:05)

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Bon ben parlé trop vite :

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/21/20100511/tu … 23e80.html

Et Cameron vient d'arriver au 10.

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Pouah, il a une vilaine tête de gros goret rose, mais tout ça va être très drôle à regarder fonctionner. Manifestement dans le deal avec les Lib Dems, les conservateurs ont dû jeter par dessus bord une bonne partie de leur programme, surtout en matière économique.

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

24

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Faudrait voir comment ça va marcher en effet.Autant sur des sujets comme l'éducation ils peuvent avoir des points communs, autant sur d'autres, (l'Europe ou l'immigration pour ne citer qu'eux) ça risque de clasher méchamment...
Et la grande question c'est simple coalition d'accord pour leur permettre d'avancer, ou pleine coalition avec des ministres lib dem ?


Ceci dit, ça risque de couter très cher aux Lib-Dem au niveau de leur base, dont une partie se sent trahie... (après avoir suivi les "Lib-Dem or Labour?" dans les facebook statuts, c'est le tour des "noo Nick!" voire des "we didn't vote for you to sell out to the tories"...)

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

ORB a écrit:

Et la grande question c'est simple coalition d'accord pour leur permettre d'avancer, ou pleine coalition avec des ministres lib dem ?

C'est une coalition gouvernementale qui se met en place, a priori : 

The Guardian a écrit:

The Lib Dems will be given up to five cabinet posts by David Cameron as he delivers on his pledge last night to have a full and proper coalition government with the Lib Dems. In an echo of the German grand coalition, Nick Clegg is expected to be appointed deputy prime minister. Vince Cable, the party's deputy leader, is being lined up to serve as George Osborne's deputy as chief secretary to the Treasury.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010 … -live-blog

On parle aussi de l'entrée au gouvernement des deux anciens leaders Lib Dems, Lord Paddy Ashdown et Sir Menzies Campbell, qui sont connus pour être beaucoup plus à gauche que Clegg.

Last edited by Surfin'USA (11-05-2010 22:10:11)

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

26

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

ça, ça risquerait d'être assez rocambolesque ! Y'a des nouvelles sur Laws?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Ce qui est magnifique c'est qu'on connait rien de l'accord, on se doute qu'il y en a un mais si ça se trouve c'est une feuille de pq torchée cet après midi remplie de vide et de creux avec un peu de couleur.

Et un vice-chancelier de l'échiquier, quelqu'un peut m'expliquer à quoi ça sert ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Elessar a écrit:

Ce qui est magnifique c'est qu'on connait rien de l'accord, on se doute qu'il y en a un mais si ça se trouve c'est une feuille de pq torchée cet après midi remplie de vide et de creux avec un peu de couleur.

lol

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

C'est beau !

« Nous avons refusé ce que voulait en nous la bête, et nous voulons retrouver l’homme partout où nous avons trouvé ce qui l’écrase. » (André Malraux; Les Voix du silence, 1951)

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

C'est bien ce que je pensais, le gars est arrivé comme pour un exposé de conf de langue à sciences po quoi.

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Quelle trahison des positions pro-européennes des lib-dems si ça se confirme. Voir aussi si ils avalent des couleuvres sur le remplacement des missiles tridents.
Je croyais que dans les status des lib-dems, les membres du parti devaient voter pour autoriser une entrée dans un gouvernement, ça ne sera pas le cas ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

C'est le conseil fédéral bidule, qui de toute façon a bien vu que les négociations avec le Labour ont merdé à cause du Labour. Cela étant c'est un des plus grands bras d'honneur aux électeurs vu qu'on sait toujours pas ce qui va se passer sur les deux points que tu nommes. Et il ose écrire red lines en plus...

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Free French a écrit:

Je croyais que dans les status des lib-dems, les membres du parti devaient voter pour autoriser une entrée dans un gouvernement, ça ne sera pas le cas ?

C'est un peu compliqué...

Conference agrees that:

    (i) in the event of any substantial proposal which could affect the Party’s independence of political action, the consent will be required of a majority of members of the Parliamentary Party in the House of Commons and the Federal Executive; and,

    (ii) unless there is a three-quarters majority of each group in favour of the proposals, the consent of the majority of those present and voting at a Special Conference convened under clause 6.6 of the Constitution; and,

    (iii) unless there is a two-thirds majority of those present and voting at that Conference in favour of the proposals, the consent of a majority of all members of the Party voting in the ballot called pursuant to clause 6.11 or 8.6 of the Constitution.

Comme il n'a pas - pour l'instant - été fait état de contestataires au sein du groupe Lib dems aux Communes même parmi l'aile gauche du parti (Simon Hugues, Sir Menzies Campbell), ça devrait passer très largement. Pour le Federal Executive, aucune idée par contre, hormis qu'il est en partie composé de MPs et de syndicalistes.

Free French a écrit:

Quelle trahison des positions pro-européennes des lib-dems si ça se confirme. Voir aussi si ils avalent des couleuvres sur le remplacement des missiles tridents.

Il faudra voir ce que ça donne bien sûr, mais l'aile thatcherienne des Tories, le Conservative Way Forward, a gueulé toute la journée contre l'alliance, ce qui signifierait que Cameron a fait pas mal de concessions.

Last edited by Surfin'USA (11-05-2010 23:40:46)

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

OK, merci. Je comprends mieux.

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Cameron et Clegg: les dossiers sur lesquels ils vont s'écharper

Par Anne-Laurence Gollion, publié le 12/05/2010


David Cameron (à gauche), le nouveau Premier ministre va devoir composer avec les exigences de Nick Clegg.

REUTERS



Déficit record, instabilité des marchés, crise institutionnelle: les défis sont nombreux pour le nouveau Premier ministre David Cameron. L'alliance avec les Libéraux-démocrates, si elle lui permet d'être majoritaire, devrait lui compliquer un peu plus la tâche.

Le discours de David Cameron à la suite de sa nomination à Downing Street se voulait plein d'entrain, après les quelques jours de flottement post-électoraux. "Je crois qu'avec les libéraux-démocrates, nous pouvons former le gouvernement fort et stable dont notre pays a besoin", a-t-il ainsi déclaré, remerciant Nick Clegg de l'aider à former son gouvernement. Si les deux hommes présentent un profil similaire - ils ont le même âge et appartiennent tous les deux à la haute société britannique passée par les grandes universités, ils n'ignorent pas que leur alliance passera par un nombre important de compromis. Les conditions ne sont pas des plus favorables pour que Cameron puisse mener à bien les travaux herculéens qui l'attendent.

L'économie: une conception différente de la fiscalité

Cela faisait partie des "lignes rouges" des libéraux-démocrates, définies à l'occasion de leur Forum social-libéral. Nick Clegg refusait en effet toute mesure fiscale "qui augmenterait les inégalités". Pour son vice-Premier ministre, Cameron a déjà accepté de réduire les impôts pour les petits revenus. En contrepartie, ila obtenu un abaissement de l'impôt sur la succession, au coeur du programme conservateur.

Cameron sera en revanche seul pour défendre son projet de diminuer les impôts pour les couples mariés. Les libéraux-démocrates devraient s'abstenir, reléguant la mesure aux calendes grecques. Ces divergences et petits arrangements mettent au jour l'alliance contre-nature des conservateurs et des lib-dems, plus proches du Labour, sur le plan économique.

Des réformes sociales à négocier

L'immigration ne va pas tarder à devenir un point de friction entre Clegg et Cameron. Les Tories défendent des quotas stricts vis-à-vis de l'immigration non-européenne, contrairement aux Lib Dems qui demandent une régularisation massive. La balance devrait pencher du côté des conservateurs. Toutefois, les conditions de détention des demandeurs d'asile devraient être assouplies. Du côté des réformes scolaires chères aux aux supporters de Cameron, l'autonomie des écoles devrait être accrue tandis que Clegg a, lui, obtenu des aides supplémentaires pour les zones défavorisées.

L'Europe: un point de divergence crucial

Le polyglotte Clegg n'a jamais caché son europhilie, lui qui est né d'une mère néerlandaise et d'un père d'ascendance russe et qui est marié à une Espagnole. Conseiller à la Commission européenne, le chef des Lib-Dems a aussi été membre du Parlement européen de 1999 à 2004. Ses déclarations en faveur de l'adoption de l'euro ont été très commentées outre-Manche.

Du côté des Tories, l'Union européenne est honnie, en témoigne la lettre présentée aux ministres de l'Union la semaine dernière, soulignant que "le Royaume-Uni n'appartient pas à la zone euro et n'a donc pas de commentaire à faire sur la résolution de la crise". En somme, Clegg pense que l'Europe est l'avenir du royaume alors que les conservateurs s'accrochent plus que jamais à la notion d'identité nationale.

Si les marchés ont plutôt bien accueilli l'arrivée d'un gouvernement Cameron-Clegg, les prochains jours seront déterminants pour la pérennité du duo. Dernier défi: le nouveau Premier ministre, en recherche de légitimité depuis son semi-succès aux législatives, va également devoir convaincre son parti de le suivre bon gré mal gré, et ce en dépit du clivage qui sépare les "jeunes" (dont fait partie Cameron) des "vieux" Tories, encore plus hostiles à l'Europe et l'immigration.

« Nous avons refusé ce que voulait en nous la bête, et nous voulons retrouver l’homme partout où nous avons trouvé ce qui l’écrase. » (André Malraux; Les Voix du silence, 1951)

36

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

C'est moi ou Cameron et Clegg se ressemblent vraiment (beaucoup beaucoup) ?
Le comble pour celui qui voulait se démarquer des deux autres et proposer une 3ème voie.

http://www.lefigaro.fr/medias/2010/05/12/20100512PHOWWW00092.jpg

http://www.lexpress.fr/medias/949/486006_cameron-et-clegg-devant-le-10-downing-street.jpg

http://img.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/03_01/clegg0503_468x674.jpg http://nealbrown.files.wordpress.com/2008/09/david-cameron.jpg

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Il manque à Clegg le goitre, je trouve.

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

38

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Avec Hague aux Affaires Etrangères et Fox à la défense, je sens que ça va rigoler dans les prochains conseils européens....


C'est moi ou Cameron et Clegg se ressemblent vraiment (beaucoup beaucoup) ?
Le comble pour celui qui voulait se démarquer des deux autres et proposer une 3ème voie.

Y'a le nez quand même... tongue

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Sur le site de la BBC, les termes de l'accord entre les Tories et les Lib Dems. C'est un véritable succès pour eux au niveau de la réforme du système politique, qui était pour les Lib Dems l'enjeu sur lequel ils ne pouvait pas reculer quitte à paraitre opportunistes (puisqu'ils influent peu sur les politiques économiques et sociales à court terme, mais deviendront incontournables si le système politique est réformé).

"It's better to burn out than to fade away".
Joseph Goebbels ou Neil Young ?

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

ORB a écrit:

Avec Hague aux Affaires Etrangères et Fox à la défense, je sens que ça va rigoler dans les prochains conseils européens....

Oui et non si ils sont affublés d'un vice ministre lib-dem à chaque fois et si le gouvernement est infoutu de définir une position claire et traine des pieds, ce qui pourrait arriver, ça réduira leur pouvoir de nuisance. En revanche c'est au Conseil que Cameron risque d'emmerder le monde, puisqu'il y ira tout seul.

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Au Royaume-Uni, "la coalition ne tiendra pas"
LEMONDE.FR | 12.05.10 | 18h49  •  Mis à jour le 12.05.10 | 18h50
   
Que pensez-vous du gouvernement de coalition de David Cameron ?

Je suis surprise de la composition du gouvernement. Je pensais que les libéraux-démocrates allaient hériter d'au moins un ministère-clé, des affaires étrangères ou de l'intérieur, que cela faisait partie des négociations. Cependant, c'est logique étant donné les résultats des lib-dems aux élections [ils ont obtenu 57 sièges]. Nick Clegg est tout de même nommé vice-premier ministre, ce qui est un succès des négociations.

Mais je confirme ce que j'avais dit au lendemain des élections : je pense que la coalition ne tiendra pas. Le seul précédent qu'on ait est la coalition "lib-lab" [lib-dem et Labour] de 1977 qui avait tenu seulement quelques mois alors que ces deux parties étaient plus proches que ne le sont les lib-dems et les conservateurs.

Pourquoi les lib-dems n'ont-ils reçu aucun poste-clé ?

On lit partout que cette alliance est contre-nature, mais, concernant les équipes dirigeantes, ce n'est pas le cas. Nick Clegg, Vince Cable, David Laws sont plutôt à la droite du Lib-Dem et se rapprochent assez des conservateurs modernes comme David Cameron. Mais Cameron ne dirige pas seul, il a derrière lui une base, des militants, qui, eux, sont beaucoup plus radicaux, notamment sur les questions européennes. De la même manière, les électeurs du Lib-Dem étaient assez horrifiés de voir cette alliance. Il a fallu composer avec ces éléments.

Comment les choses vont-elles se passer maintenant, dans la pratique du pouvoir ?

David Cameron a besoin d'une majorité au Parlement pour faire passer ses lois, notamment celles sur la mise en place d'un budget d'urgence, qui est la priorité essentielle. Or le Parti libéral-démocrate est divisé et rien ne dit qu'il votera comme un seul homme. Le Parti conservateur est lui aussi divisé entre David Cameron, conservateur moderne, et des hommes comme Liam Fox, par exemple, qui est très à la droite du parti.

Cela va poser problème pour la réforme du scrutin électoral, qui était la condition principale des lib-dems lors des négociations. S'il ne devait y avoir qu'une condition, ce serait celle-là ; il est impensable qu'ils l'abandonnent. Sinon, ça sera l'implosion du Parti libéral-démocrate.

Les conservateurs reviennent au pouvoir après treize ans d'absence, en pleine crise économique. Quels sont les enjeux ?

Derrière le vernis, l'affichage moderne qu'essaie de donner David Cameron aux tories, je pense que ce parti reste marqué et verrouillé par le tatchérisme traditionnel, autoritaire. Sur l'économie, qui est actuellement une question très prioritaire, la bonne vieille austérité tatchérienne va revenir au galop.

Il y a tout de même du progrès, l'image des conservateurs se rajeunit, il y a d'ailleurs beaucoup de jeunes au gouvernement. Il y a eu aussi du progrès sur la féminisation : 20 % des parlementaires du groupe conservateur sont des femmes, contre 9 % à la dernière élection. Cela dit, il n'y a qu'une seule femme au gouvernement...
Propos recueillis par Hélène Bekmezian

C'est beau de rêver : la coalition ne tiendra pas :


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q73D_qyp … r_embedded

David Miliband veut succéder à Gordon Brown à la tête du Labour

Par Reuters, publié le 12/05/2010 à 20:46

Moins de 24 heures après la démission de Gordon Brown et son remplacement par le conservateur David Cameron au 10, Downing Street, le secrétaire sortant au Foreign Office, David Miliband, a été le premier dirigeant travailliste à faire acte de candidature à la tête du Labour.


David Miliband, qui est âgé de 44 ans, est le favori des "bookmakers" pour reprendre les rênes du New Labour battu par les Tories aux élections législatives du 6 mai en Grande-Bretagne.

"Je me présente à la direction du parti parce que je crois pouvoir mener le Labour pour le reconstruire et en faire le champion de grandes réformes sociales et économiques" dont a besoin le pays, a déclaré à la presse l'ancien chef de la diplomatie.

Le Parti travailliste est revenu sur les bancs de l'opposition après 13 ans de règne sans partage sous la houlette de Tony Blair, puis de Gordon Brown.

La veille, David Cameron a été prié par la reine Elizabeth II de former le nouveau gouvernement après la démission de Gordon Brown et l'accord conclu entre les Tories, qui comptent le plus grand nombre d'élus à Westminster mais sans obtenir la majorité absolue de sièges, et les centristes du LibDem.

Estelle Shirbon; Jean-Loup Fiévet pour le service français

Last edited by Emmanuel Goldstein (13-05-2010 01:55:50)

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Voilà surement le chemin que vont prendre les différents Etats européens dans les mois qui viennent.

Londres taille dans ses dépenses, d'autres mesures à venir

Par Reuters, publié le 24/05/2010 à 11:43



Le ministre britannique des Finances George Osborne a dévoilé lundi un plan de réduction des dépenses publiques de 6,2 milliards de livres (7,3 milliards d'euros), tout en prévenant que le plus difficile restait à venir avec la présentation d'un collectif budgétaire le 22 juin.
Le ministre britannique des Finances George Osborne (à gauche) et le secrétaire d'Etat au Trésor David Laws ont présenté leur plan de réduction des dépenses publiques de 6,25 milliards de livres (7,3 milliards d'euros), dont l'essentiel sera consacré à la réduction du déficit budgétaire. (Reuters/Dan Kitwood/Pool)

Le ministre britannique des Finances George Osborne (à gauche) et le secrétaire d'Etat au Trésor David Laws ont présenté leur plan de réduction des dépenses publiques de 6,25 milliards de livres (7,3 milliards d'euros), dont l'essentiel sera consacré à la réduction du déficit budgétaire. (Reuters/Dan Kitwood/Pool)

Le secrétaire d'Etat au Trésor David Laws a souligné que la réduction des dépenses publiques était destinée à "provoquer une onde de choc dans l'administration", alors que les syndicats ont déploré son impact sur les services, l'économie et l'emploi.

De l'avis des analystes, les mesures annoncées, qui correspondent peu ou prou à ce qui était attendu, seront utiles pour réduire un déficit budgétaire record mais elles risquent très vite d'être éclipsées par les mesures d'austérité qui vont être nécessaires pour maintenir la note triple A de la Grande-Bretagne.

Bien que les prévisions de la dette publique aient été récemment revues en baisse, George Osborne a assuré que le gouvernement de coalition des conservateurs et des libéraux-démocrates ne dévierait pas de son objectif prioritaire : réduire le déficit budgétaire qui atteint aujourd'hui 11% du produit intérieur brut.

La Grande-Bretagne emboîte ainsi le pas à d'autres pays fortement endettés de la zone euro tels l'Espagne et le Portugal qui ont annoncé des plans d'austérités drastiques. Le gouvernement italien se réunit mardi pour approuver à son tour un budget d'austérité.

PRIORITÉ À LA RÉDUCTION DES DÉFICITS

Toutefois, à la différence de ses voisins européens, la Grande-Bretagne n'a pas subi de forte hausse du coût de l'emprunt. A la mi-journée, les obligations britanniques évoluaient en hausse, les investisseurs saluant le ciblage des réductions des dépenses publiques.

La livre sterling évoluait en hausse face à l'euro mais en baisse contre le dollar.

"C'est la première fois que ce gouvernement annonce des décisions difficiles concernant les dépenses. Ce ne sera pas la dernière", a prévenu George Osborne lors d'une conférence de presse.

Sa formation, le Parti conservateur, avait promis pendant la campagne de réduire les dépenses dès cette année. Les Lib Dems avaient exprimé des craintes sur l'impact de telles mesures sur la croissance mais ils ont finalement donné leur feu vert.

"Cette initiative est destinée à provoquer une onde de choc dans l'administration afin que les ministres et les fonctionnaires se demandent si telles dépenses dans tels secteurs sont vraiment une priorité dans la période difficile que nous traversons", a expliqué David Laws.

En guise de concession pour les Lib Dems, 500 millions de livres sur les 6,2 milliards de réductions des dépenses seront réinvestis dans l'éducation et le logement social.

CHOIX TRÈS DIFFICILES

En revanche, tout le reste sera consacré à la réduction du déficit. Les financements des "quangos", ces organismes qui conseillent le gouvernement, seront amputés de 513 millions de livres. Les embauches dans la fonction publique seront gelées et presque tous les ministères vont devoir faire des économies.

Le ministère des Entreprises, par exemple, verra son budget réduit de plus de 800 millions de livres.

"Ce nouveau gouvernement a le mérite d'avoir ciblé les réductions ministère par ministère et ce en l'espace de moins de deux semaines", commente Hetal Mehta, conseiller économique à Ernst & Young Item Club.

"Mais il faut garder à l'esprit que six milliards de livres n'est qu'une goutte d'eau dans l'océan en comparaison avec la cure d'austérité qui sera demandée au parlement. Le collectif budgétaire et la revue générale des dépenses qui suivra seront des indicateurs cruciaux pour évaluer la crédibilité du programme de réduction des déficits".

Même si la tâche qui attend le nouveau gouvernement est immense, les statistiques publiées la semaine dernière suggèrent que le pire est peut-être passé pour les finances publique avec la remontée des recettes fiscales.

Le montant des emprunts d'Etat pour 2009-2010 a ainsi été révisé en baisse de près de 7,5 milliards de livres.

Mais le pays ne pourra faire l'économie d'une réduction conséquente de ses dépenses au risque de provoquer des tensions avec les syndicats.

Pour Kate Baker, membre du comité de politique monétaire de la Banque d'Angleterre, un tour de vis budgétaire supplémentaire pourrait peser sur la croissance, mais si rien n'est fait pour réduire les déficits, les marchés risquent de prendre peur.

"Des choix très difficiles vont devoir être faits en terme de politique budgétaire", a-t-elle dit au Financial Times.

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Quelle est la proportion des dépenses réalisées dans le cadre des jeux de 2010 à Londres dans la dette Britannique ?

"À bas le second degré !" "Monsieur, vous êtes d'une remarquable insignifiance."
Don't hit me with them negative waves so early in the morning.

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Que pensez vous de la majorité absolue obtenue par Cameron ?

Bruno Le Roux a dit que l'"austérité" de Hollande avait ses chances pour 2017 LOL.

45

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Je pense qu'il va être en position de force dorénavant pour négocier à Bruxelles et qu'il fera régulièrement peser la menace d'un référendum sur la sortie de l'Union européenne. Les sondages se sont aussi bien plantés.

"François Hollande, qui est et reste à mes yeux un très bon Président, un décideur juste et bon, d'une intelligence fine et curieuse de tout, posé, humble et droit, un grand homme politique, bien élu, qui a engagé de très nombreuses réformes qui s'imposaient depuis des années voire des décennies" (Greg)
"Dès que je vois inscrit "FDL", je ne lis pas. C'est perte de temps. Il est totalement timbré, violent, et ses écrits me révulsent.  Son idéologie qui a évolué vers l'extrême droite est symptomatique d'une véritable dégénérescence intellectuelle." (Greg)
"Le CCIF défend les libertés fondamentales." (Broz)

46

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Flanby qui fait la leçon à Cameron... On croit rêver mais non, c'est la réalité.

Le Figaro - AFP a écrit:


Référendum sur la sortie de l'UE: Hollande rappelle Cameron à l'ordre

Le président François Hollande a rappelé à David Cameron vendredi à son arrivée à l'aéroport de Grand Case à Saint-Martin (Antilles), qu'il y avait "des règles en Europe" dans une conversation téléphonique au lendemain de la victoire des conservateurs aux élections législatives en Grande-Bretagne.

"Il est légitime de tenir compte des aspirations des britanniques mais il y a des règles en Europe et parmi ces règles il y la concertation", a affirmé François Hollande alors que le Premier ministre britannique a réaffirmé sa volonté d'organiser un référendum pour ou contre la sortie de la Grande-Bretagne de l'Union Européenne .

La crainte d'un "Brexit"

"Je lui ai dit que je voulais travailler avec lui notamment pour que nous puissions regarder la place du Royaume-Uni dans l'Union européenne", a déclaré François Hollande. "Il est légitime de tenir compte des aspirations des Britanniques" mais "parmi ces règles il y a la concertation", a-t-il ajouté. "Le fait qu'il ait une majorité permettra justement d'avoir une stabilité car ce qu'on pouvait craindre c'était une instabilité qui aurait rendu difficiles les choix pour les britanniques", a encore dit le président. "Ils n'ont pas dit qu'ils voulaient partir de l'UE", a-t-il précisé. "Cameron a dit qu'il voulait discuter, donc discutons", a-t-il conclu.

Vendredi, David Cameron, à peine réélu, a réitéré sa principale promesse: l'organisation d'ici à 2017 d'un référendum sur le maintien ou non du pays dans l'Union européenne. Une perspective inquiétante pour ses partenaires européens, qui craignent un "Brexit", un acronyme désignant une sortie du club des 28.

http://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-actu/2015/ … -ordre.php

"François Hollande, qui est et reste à mes yeux un très bon Président, un décideur juste et bon, d'une intelligence fine et curieuse de tout, posé, humble et droit, un grand homme politique, bien élu, qui a engagé de très nombreuses réformes qui s'imposaient depuis des années voire des décennies" (Greg)
"Dès que je vois inscrit "FDL", je ne lis pas. C'est perte de temps. Il est totalement timbré, violent, et ses écrits me révulsent.  Son idéologie qui a évolué vers l'extrême droite est symptomatique d'une véritable dégénérescence intellectuelle." (Greg)
"Le CCIF défend les libertés fondamentales." (Broz)

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Free French a écrit:

Que pensez vous de la majorité absolue obtenue par Cameron ?

Bruno Le Roux a dit que l'"austérité" de Hollande avait ses chances pour 2017 LOL.


Cela illustre que les électeurs préfèrent l'original à la copie, les Conservateurs au New Labor. Et que là où il y a eu une alternative de gauche crédible et bien implantée, c'est-à-dire en Écosse, celle-ci a largement triomphé.

"Et sans races, comment peut-on parler de racisme?" - sabaidee, 16/05/2014
"Allez, rince ton visage et enlève la merde dans tes yeux, va lire les commentaires des lecteurs du monde (le monde, hein, pas présent ou national hebdo) et tu percevras le degré d'agacement que suscitent ces associations subventionnées..." - sabaidee, 06/09/2016

"(influence léniniste de la "praxis historique réalisante et légitimée par sa propre réalisation historique effective", au sens hégélien du terme, dans l'action islamiste, au travers de l'état islamique - je n'utilise volontairement pas de majuscule pour cet "état" en ce que je lui dénie toute effectivité historique)" - Greg, 18/07/2016

"Oui oui, je maintiens. Il n'y a rien de plus consensuel que le Point. " - FDL, 28/07/2016

48

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

On peut dire qu'il commence en fanfare, celui-là.
Et j'adore sa justification. On voit tout de suite qu'il ne prend pas du tout les gens pour des abrutis, non non non.

Le Figaro a écrit:

Jeremy Corbyn choque en refusant de chanter l'hymne national

Alors que ses voisins, au premier rang de la cathédrale Saint-Paul, reprenaient les paroles de l'hymne, le travailliste radical, qui a été élu triomphalement à la tête du Labour samedi, n'a pas ouvert la bouche.

Le nouveau chef du Labour, qui prône l'abolition de la monarchie, est resté silencieux mercredi quand God save the Queen a été entonné lors d'une cérémonie commémorant la Bataille d'Angleterre. Son attitude fait des vagues, y compris au sein de son parti.

Un silence écrasant. Le nouveau chef du Labour, Jeremy Corbyn, est depuis mercredi sous le feu des critiques des milieux conservateurs, de l'armée et de certains membres de son parti pour avoir refusé de chanter mercredi l'hymne national anglais God save the queen, lors d'une cérémonie commémorant la Bataille d'Angleterre de 1940.

Alors que ses voisins, au premier rang de la cathédrale Saint-Paul, reprenaient les paroles de l'hymne, le travailliste radical, qui a été élu triomphalement à la tête du Labour samedi, n'a pas ouvert la bouche, préférant «un silence respectueux», justifiait alors un porte-parole de son parti.

Plus tôt dans la journée, Jeremy Corbyn qui n'a jamais caché ses sentiments antimonarchistes et pacifistes, avait publié un communiqué rendant hommage au courage des pilotes de la Royal air force face aux bombardiers de l'Axe. «Ma mère était surveillante contre les raids aériens et mon père servait dans la Home Guard. Comme tous les membres de cette génération, ils ont montré énormément d'héroïsme et de détermination pour vaincre le fascisme. Nous leur devons une énorme dette», a rappelé le successeur d'Ed Miliband. Et de poursuivre: «La perte de vies civiles et militaires doit être commémorée. Nous devons tout faire pour que nos enfants ne connaissent jamais les horreurs de la guerre».
«Où est le spin-doctor?» s'alarme la presse

Malgré cette déclaration matinale, l'attitude défiante de Jeremy Corbyn a déchaîné les critiques. À commencer par la presse conservatrice. «Corbyn snobe la reine et son pays» titre le Daily Telegraph qui s'agace également du costume dégingandé du député. «Les anciens combattants ouvrent le feu après l'affront de Corbyn» proclame The Times. «Honteux: Corbyn refuse de chanter» s'émeut le Daily Express tandis que le tabloïd The Daily Star ouvre sur «Un zéro pour Corby: le gaucho refuse de chanter». Toutefois le Daily Mirror reconnaît que vu les positions républicaines de Corbyn, le voir entonner God saves the Queen aurait été hypocrite.

Les journaux, classés à gauche, sont eux perplexes. Le Guardian estime que le leader «a désespérément besoin d'un conseiller en image». Même interrogation du côté de The Independent qui se demande «Où est le spin-doctor?».

Les pilotes survivants de la Bataille d'Angleterre n'ont pas caché leur indignation. «Ce silence prouve l'étroitesse d'esprit et la bigoterie de Corbyn», a dénoncé l'un d'eux, tandis qu'un collègue demandait même à ce que l'on passe l'élu par les armes! Petit-fils de Churchill, le député conservateur Nicholas Soames a condamné «le manque de respect et la grande impolitesse» du travailliste. Les réactions au sein du Labour, très divisé et inquiet après la victoire de samedi, sont aussi mitigées. «Son silence a blessé et offensé» a reconnu la parlementaire Kate Green, membre du cabinet fantôme de Jeremy Corbyn, «cela aurait été respectueux de chanter les paroles».

Jeudi matin, peu avant sa première séance de questions au premier ministre, Jeremy Corbyn s'est finalement expliqué sur son silence et a dit «s'être recueilli et avoir pensé à ses parents». Interrogé sur sa position sur l'hymne national lors de futurs déplacements, il a contourné la question promettant d' «y participer d'une manière appropriée». Mais des sources travaillistes affirment qu'il donnera désormais de la voix sur God save the queen.

http://www.lefigaro.fr/international/20 … tional.php

"François Hollande, qui est et reste à mes yeux un très bon Président, un décideur juste et bon, d'une intelligence fine et curieuse de tout, posé, humble et droit, un grand homme politique, bien élu, qui a engagé de très nombreuses réformes qui s'imposaient depuis des années voire des décennies" (Greg)
"Dès que je vois inscrit "FDL", je ne lis pas. C'est perte de temps. Il est totalement timbré, violent, et ses écrits me révulsent.  Son idéologie qui a évolué vers l'extrême droite est symptomatique d'une véritable dégénérescence intellectuelle." (Greg)
"Le CCIF défend les libertés fondamentales." (Broz)

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Le jour où je serai Président de la République, je changerai l'hymne national, ce sera l'Internationale. Et gare aux fesses de celui qui ne la chantera pas ! Les foudres de la presse inféodée à mon pouvoir s'abattront sur lui.

"Et sans races, comment peut-on parler de racisme?" - sabaidee, 16/05/2014
"Allez, rince ton visage et enlève la merde dans tes yeux, va lire les commentaires des lecteurs du monde (le monde, hein, pas présent ou national hebdo) et tu percevras le degré d'agacement que suscitent ces associations subventionnées..." - sabaidee, 06/09/2016

"(influence léniniste de la "praxis historique réalisante et légitimée par sa propre réalisation historique effective", au sens hégélien du terme, dans l'action islamiste, au travers de l'état islamique - je n'utilise volontairement pas de majuscule pour cet "état" en ce que je lui dénie toute effectivité historique)" - Greg, 18/07/2016

"Oui oui, je maintiens. Il n'y a rien de plus consensuel que le Point. " - FDL, 28/07/2016

50

Re: Parti conservateur, New Labour, Lib-Dems : vie politique anglaise

Eh bien écoute, pareil pour moi sauf que ce sera Vive Henri IV.

"François Hollande, qui est et reste à mes yeux un très bon Président, un décideur juste et bon, d'une intelligence fine et curieuse de tout, posé, humble et droit, un grand homme politique, bien élu, qui a engagé de très nombreuses réformes qui s'imposaient depuis des années voire des décennies" (Greg)
"Dès que je vois inscrit "FDL", je ne lis pas. C'est perte de temps. Il est totalement timbré, violent, et ses écrits me révulsent.  Son idéologie qui a évolué vers l'extrême droite est symptomatique d'une véritable dégénérescence intellectuelle." (Greg)
"Le CCIF défend les libertés fondamentales." (Broz)